Review: The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster by Scott Wilbanks

Review: The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster by Scott WilbanksThe Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster by Scott Wilbanks
on August 4, 2015
Pages: 400
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Annabelle Aster doesn't bow to convention-not even that of space and time-which makes the 1890s Kansas wheat field that has appeared in her modern-day San Francisco garden easy to accept. Even more peculiar is Elsbeth, the truculent schoolmarm who sends Annie letters through the mysterious brass mailbox perched on the picket fence that now divides their two worlds.

Annie and Elsbeth's search for an explanation to the hiccup in the universe linking their homes leads to an unsettling discovery-and potential disaster for both of them. Together they must solve the mystery of what connects them before one of them is convicted of a murder that has yet to happen...and yet somehow already did.

I received this book from Sourcebooks in exchange for an honest review.

The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster starts off with a bang. An old Victorian home suddenly appears in Elsbeth’s wheat field. Elsbeth lives in the late nineteeth-century, mind you. So, with all her pluck, she stomps over there and attempts to ring the bell. Only she’s catapulted back to her own home. Strange. So she does the next best thing. She writes a stern letter and leaves it in the mailbox.

Annie, a brazen young woman living in 1995 San Francisco, opens a door to her back yard and suddenly see a wheat field. She goes to investigate. Just as she’s about to reach the farm house, she’s catapulted back to her home. So she does the next best thing. She writes a letter and leaves it in the mailbox.

What follows is a heartwarming tale of time travel, family, friendship, and a mystery to solve. The cast of characters are quirky and three-dimensional. I thought Wilbanks did a great job creating outcast characters who find each other in the most unlikely of circumstances. Their relationships are authentic and beautiful. From dressing like a Victorian, to stuttering, to unexpectedly falling in love, Wilbanks creates three-dimensional characters who shine.

Though the story starts off slow and is a little hard to follow, hang in there because you’re in for a wild ride on the space-time continuum. All will be explained, I promise. Once the setting is established, the story takes off. I couldn’t stop reading.

I wish I could tell you more about this really fun book, but since everything is connected in the story, I’m afraid I’ll give something away.

four-stars

© 2015 – 2016, Jessica Workman Holland. All rights reserved.